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Since the start of our freshmen year in the fall of 2018, we noticed the social miscommunication among students in the district. Being freshmen in the capital, there are so many things that are offered but no platform that organizes it for college students. After becoming...

 

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TheSportsMove: Violence isn’t the answer when it comes to the Houston Astros cheating scandal.

By PJ Chandra

Cheaters. Scoundrels. Liars. F*** them. The Houston Astros have been called everything these last few months while Major League Baseball has been up their asses about an investigation into whether or not they cheated to win the 2017 World Series Championship against Los Angeles Dodgers. They fired their manager and General Manager after they were suspended for the year. However, here is the issue that I have with this whole situation. If you want to vacate them of the title that’s fine. If you want to make them suspended for life that’s fine. If you even want to take them of a playoff spot this year that’s fine. HOWEVER. It is NOT fine for the pitchers of the MLB to bean the Astros with pitches this year and target them as a form of revenge as many people predict that will happen as that is assault and why people want that to happen, I don’t know!

In Spring Training so far as of March 2nd, the Houston Astros have been hit by 7 pitches (the most in the league) which is ridiculous, and obviously intentional. Since when was violence the form of payback for cheaters? Also, imagine being a part of a team that cheated to win, but you were a player that wasn’t involved in the situation and then you go up to bat and all of a sudden next thing you know, you’re knocked out because an opposing pitcher for the sore losers like New York Yankees Arolids Chapman hits you in the head with a 100 MPH fastball. 

Nate White, a sophomore at AU who is a lifelong Phillies fan has an opposing view: “If the league refuses to hold the team accountable in any meaningful way, you can't blame opposing players for serving as their own mechanism of accountability. Baseball is a game of emotions.” I think Nate is correct in the way that players can serve their own form of mechanism of accountability for baseball, but my question to Nate is is violence the answer? 

Cam Wejnert-Depue, a grad  student who is a more passionate NHL fan, seems to agree with Nate saying that, “equivalent to fighting in the NHL, beaning is baseball is a part of the game that can not be removed,” but I believe even this has its flaws because you can get penalized for fighting in the NHL by being sent to the box and for the MLB the punishments aren’t harsh enough. 

While this certainly is an emotional and definitely divisive issue, I strongly believe violence is not the answer to dealing with the Houston Astros as my idol Mahatma Gandhi said, Non-violence is the greatest force at the disposal of mankind. It is mightier than the mightiest weapon of destruction devised by the ingenuity of man.”